ACL Rehab Blog

An uninterrupted account of my ACL reconstruction rehab. A brief recap:

  1. Knee went pop in July 2013 during a wrestling class.
  2. Went to GP, who guessed it was a subluxed knee (dislocation and relocation) and that it was probably some patella bruising that was causing the pain and near total loss of ROM. Requested, but was denied an MRI.
  3. Went to regular Physio from August- October which increased ROM and had me almost back to normal.
  4. Revisited GP with complaints of knee locking and buckling beneath me on a regular basis. Twice is caused me to fall to ground in pain. Requested an MRI, and was booked in for one in November.
  5. MRI results through 24th Dec showed a full ACL rupture and I was heavily persuaded to undergo surgery. Merry freakin’ Christmas.
  6. Surgeon favoured patella graft as it closer resembles ACL and has doesn’t have a history of re-tearing/stretching as much as hamstring. After clearing that I would be ok to kneel post surgery (eventually) I opted to go ahead.
  7. Surgery was booked and carried out on April 25th 2014, because the NHS is cray slow.

 

Click below for link to each blog: 

DAY OF SURGERY

DAY 1

DAY 2

DAY 3

DAY 4

DAY 5

DAY 6

DAY 7

WEEK 2

WEEK 3 

WEEK 4

WEEK 5

WEEK 6

WEEKS 7 & 8

WEEKS 9 & 10

WEEKS 11 & 12

WEEKS 13 & 14

WEEKS 15, 16, 17 & 18

WEEKS 19 & 20

WEEKS 21 & 22

WEEKS 23, 24, 25, 26 & 27

MONTH 8

MONTH 10

MONTH 12


5 thoughts on “ACL Rehab Blog”

  • Really informative blog, with all the weeks happening regarding the acl reconstruction. It will definitely help to understand the patients about what involves and what need to be done while doing the construction.

  • Nice blog.Very informative.This blog is useful for anyone and everyone who is going to have a ACL surgery. For those who don’t know about Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL),it lies within the knee joint and is about 4cm long, binding tibia to femur. The ACL prevents forward slipping of tibia on femur and stops hyperextension of the knee. It runs through a special notch in femur called Intercondylar Notch and attaches to a special area of tibia called the tibial spine. The
    ACL is the main controller of tibia’s movement under femur. This is called anterior translation of the tibia. If tibia moves too far, the ACL can rupture.

  • The ACL is the anterior cruciate ligament. It is one of four major ligaments within our knee. The ACL reconstruction is clearly the most commonly injured of the 4 major ligaments. Most people who tear their cruciate ligament have sustained a twisting or pivoting injury. The most common sports leading to an ACL tear include soccer, football, basketball and skiing.

  • Anatomical discoveries and a growing appreciation of the knee as a complex organ are driving innovations in patient care decision-making following anterior cruciate ligament ACL tear injury. Surgeons are increasing their efforts to restore combined mechanical-neurosensory ACL function and placing more consideration on when to reconstruct versus repair native anatomical structures.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *